The global mining industry has come a long way since the days when coal-blackened miners would carry a bird underground with them  in hopes its distress would alert them to the presence of toxic gases

CALGARY — Forget about the canary in the coal mine — experts say the day is coming when there won’t even be a need for a human.

The global mining industry has come a long way since the days when coal-blackened miners would carry a bird underground with them  in hopes its distress would alert them to the presence of toxic gases.

Today, companies are employing everything from driverless haul trucks to remote-controlled and robotic drilling machines to remove human labour from some of their most hazardous operations.

Saskatoon-based Nutrien Ltd. — which has been working to develop tele-remote technology at its network of six potash mines in Saskatchewan — successfully mined an entire production

​Technology and tradition may sound like an unusual mix, but it’s not when it comes to northern life.

This past spring, Sofia Parra was among a number of industrial design students from Carleton University in Ottawa to make the trip to the Na-Cho Nyak Dun First Nation community of Mayo, Yukon.

She met with a group of First Nations women at the Yukon University Makerspace program who were already helping her with the design of Hesper, a coat for the dark days and nights of winter.

Parra started working three years ago on the concept of Hesper, named for the Hesperides constellation containing the morning and evening stars.

The coat lights up, activated by the heat of a human body. It is equipped with a lightweight circuit that allows modules embedded in the material to be powered by thermoelectricity, or the conversion of temperature differences to electric voltage. The heat

Huawei Technologies Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou reacts as she leaves her home to attend a court hearing in Vancouver, Canada, August 10, 2021.

Jennifer Gauthier | Reuters

SHANGHAI — Huawei’s Chief Financial Officer Meng Wanzhou said Wednesday that applying 5G technology to business was more difficult than she had expected.

One of the expectations for 5G connectivity is that beyond faster mobile phone connections for individual consumers, the technology can better enable self-driving vehicles and factory automation.

Meng said the challenges of bringing 5G to business was underestimated and that it’s completely different than previous 2G, 3G or 4G generations. She said only when 5G becomes part of the ecosystem can it be possible to realize operations at scale.

Meng was speaking at a keynote session at the Shanghai Mobile World Congress on Wednesday, where she spoke broadly about the benefits of 5G to consumption and the economy.

The

Google’s programmatic ad product, called Google Ads, is the largest exchange and made $168 billion in advertising revenue last year. The company has come under criticism for serving ads on content farms in the past, even though its own policies prohibit sites from placing Google-served ads on pages with “spammy automatically generated content.” Around a quarter of the sites flagged by NewsGuard featured programmatic ads from major brands. Of the 393 ads from big brands found on AI-generated sites, 356 were served by Google.

“We have strict policies that govern the type of content that can monetize on our platform,” Michael Aciman, a policy communications manager for Google, told MIT Technology Review in an email. “For example, we don’t allow ads to run alongside harmful content, spammy or low-value content, or content that’s been solely copied from other sites. When enforcing these policies, we focus on the quality of

The tech – which uses a stop sign-sized terminal which beams lasers carrying data to a corresponding terminal – will provide high-speed Internet access.

This is not the first time that Alphabet, the parent company of Google, has embarked on a mission to bring reliable, cheap Internet to communities in rural and remote areas.

But this time around, the team at the tech giant’s innovation hub X-lab has learnt from past failures.

In 2016, the lab sought to broaden Internet access by using stratospheric balloons but that project was ultimately wound down due to high costs.

Now they’ve turned to a new technology for what they call the Taara project: using neatly designed terminals that beam data carrying-lasers to corresponding terminals over fixed distances – essentially fibre-optic Internet without the cables.

According to the head of Taara, Mahesh Krishnaswamy, things are progressing better this time around.

And now telecommunication partners